Faculty of Biological Sciences

Endothelial Cell Biology Unit

Principal Investigators

 

 

Dr Vas Ponnambalam

 

Prof. Shervanthi Homer-Vanniasinkam

 

Central theme: Understanding, diagnosis and treatment of vascular disease

The aim of the Endothelial Cell Biology Unit (ECBU) is to make fundamental advances in understanding the molecular and cellular basis for vascular function and to translate such findings into diagnosis, prevention and cure of cancer, cardiovascular and peripheral arterial disease. The Unit comprises a mixture of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, clinicians and medical intercalating BSc students. We have an additional 2-3 final year undergraduate Biochemistry, Medical Biochemistry BSc honours and ERASMUS (European exchange programme) project students who work with us in Semesters 1 and 2 (October-March) in each academic year. ECBU was born through existing collaborations between 3 Leeds scientists: Vas Ponnambalam, John Walker and Shervanthi Homer-Vanniasinkam.  VP is a cell biologist and molecular biologist working on membrane trafficking and signalling, JW is a biochemist studying calcium fluxes and enzyme activity, SHV is a vascular surgeon with interests in therapeutic strategies for vascular disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention.Our academic appointments (and teaching duties) are in the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology linked to the Biochemistry and Biological Sciences BSc programmes (VP, JHW) andthe Faculty of Medicine & Health linked to the Medicine MBChB programme (SHV).

ECBU relocated from the old laboratories in the East-West wing of Garstang Building on Mount Preston Street to the newly built Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health & Therapeutics (LIGHT) on Clarendon Way in August 2006. After 8.5 yrs working in this translational facility, ECBU again moved in early 2015 to the laboratories in the North-South wing of the Garstang Building. In this new communal laboratory and office space, we share space and facilities with other groups working on membrane protein function, cardiac function, diabetes, neuroscience and biosensors.