Graduate School

Carly Lynsdale "I thought it would be good to build up my transferable skills and experience because I want to work in ecology and conservation." Read more

MRes / MSc Biodiversity and Conservation

 

Biodiversity and Conservation

The MSc and MRes courses at Leeds are designed to prepare recent graduates for a PhD programme or to begin a career in conservation. For established conservation professionals our modules provide additional skills to support them in their work. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

The biodiversity masters degrees offer a wide range of options allowing for personalised courses of study that lay the groundwork for further academic work and/or professional development in the field. We aim to provide our graduates with:

  • An understanding of the biological principles and institutional framework underlying biodiversity and its conservation
  • A core body of analytical and practical skills required to operate effectively in an academic or professional career
  • The ability to identify plants and animals
  • Experience in biodiversity and/or conservation-related research

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

Marine iguanasIn a nutshell, MRes students have fewer taught modules, but carry out two major research project assignments rather than one. Most students taking the MRes are planning to probably go on to do a PhD or have an MSc degree already. Many of our MSc graduates also subsequently do PhDs, but initially prefer to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available.

Part time or full time?

The programmes fill a full year, from September to September. Part time options are also available, over two years.

What are the career prospects?

Desert research, Brandberg, NamibiaFor most of our students this is the ‘bottom line’. Our graduates have gone on to a very varied range of biodiversity and conservation jobs and careers around the world. There is intense competition for posts in conservation-related areas in the UK. A masters degree improves your chances, and our graduates have a good track record of finding employment. Potential employers usually look for academic qualifications in combination with practical experience, so voluntary work in combination with academic qualifications is often required. See the biodiversity and conservation careers section for details of our extensive links with the sector and graduate case studies.

Overseas students

The majority of our participants are from the UK, but we strongly encourage overseas applications. Each year we are very pleased to receive students from a variety of countries, both in the EU and beyond. Our experience is that they bring a fresh perspective to issues relevant to the course, and many have useful or even unique knowledge and skills.

Many overseas students already have positions in nature conservation and their time in Leeds not only benefits themselves, but also everyone else, because they bring skills, experience and background that are quite distinct from those brought by British students. For example, past overseas students have experience of managing hundreds of square miles of forest, have been involved in reducing the impact of elephants on agriculture, and have been authorities in Mediterranean turtle conservation.

Many of the Biodiversity and Conservation Masters research projects take place overseas. It is often possible for fieldwork to be conducted in the country of origin of the project student, if so desired.

Frequently asked questions

Hopefully you will find all the information you need by browsing the tabs above and taking a look at the recent student and graduate profiles. If you still have a question we haven't covered, please do not hesitate to contact our admissions team.

 

Why choose to study biodiversity at Leeds?

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "Centre of Excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training . We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly. Our postgraduate biodiversity and conservation courses are distinct from similar courses offered in the UK in their concentration on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management.

Beehawk mothThese biodiversity Masters courses offer:   

  • the opportunity to combine academic topics with ‘hands-on’ practical conservation
  • exciting contemporary research-led topics such as population dynamics and conservation genetics, together with options for highly practical training in areas such GIS, bat biology and plant identification.
  • opportunities to study full time, or part time over 2 years
  • selected modules with elements taught by external partners such as Natural England and the Environment Agency
  • conservation internships ('sandwich year') allow students to gain credits for relevant work
  • an unrivalled location for study sites: the Yorkshire Dales, Lake District, North York Moors and Peak District National Park are all close by
  • Leeds University Farm facilities for projects and fieldwork
  • Calendulahigh student satisfaction

Entry Requirements

Title

MSc/MRes Biodiversity and Conservation

Practical work during Welcome Weekend

Qualification

Master of Science (MSc); Master of Research (MRes)

Duration

12 months full-time
24 months part-time

2014 entry requirements Normally a 2:1 honours degree or equivalent, but relevant experience may be taken into account
English language requirements If English is not your first language, please check our minimum English language requirements.
Start date September annually (one intake only)

Admissions enquiries

Postgraduate Taught Admissions
Tel. +44 (0) 113 343 1418
Email: fbsgrad@leeds.ac.uk

Admissions tutor

Dr Rupert Quinnell
Tel. +44 (0) 113 343 2824
Email: r.j.quinnell@leeds.ac.uk

 

Department

Faculty of Biological Sciences Graduate School

Programme leader profile

Dr Rupert Quinnell

Programme team profiles Meet the Biodiversity and Conservation Masters team

Course brochure

See our Postgraduate Taught (Masters) brochure

Course Structure

Fumaria CapreolataStudents may study for an MSc or MRes. It is possible to study on either a full or part-time basis. Teaching methods include project work, field courses, lectures, practicals, tutorials and workshops. Compared with undergraduate degrees, more of the work is carried out in teams. Typically between 40 and 50 students enrol each year, with about 25% taking the MRes degree. The course lasts 12 months, with activity broken into three parts:

  • September-December (teaching semester 1)
  • January -May (teaching semester 2)
  • May-September (exclusively project period)

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

In a nutshell, MRes students have fewer taught modules, but carry out two major research projects rather than one. Most students taking the MRes are planning to probably go on to do a PhD or have an MSc degree already. Many of our MSc graduates also subsequently do PhDs, but initially prefer to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available.

Research Projects

Visitor Centre, Belize The research component is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A significant number of students are based overseas for their project. More research project information and interactive world map showing some of the locations.

Modular Structure

Both the MSc and MRes are modular; the course consists of a large number of optional modules and a few compulsory ones (these few emphasize our belief in the importance of original research projects). Students may add any combination of optional modules to the compulsory modules to make a total of 180 credits. This flexibility allows students to personalise their area of study. Module descriptions are given below.

  • Which modules should I chose?

    Getting optional module choices correct is extremely important. Ask yourself which combination of skills will be most helpful in your future career. If reserve management is where you see yourself then (along with being able to drive a car) having a chain saw licence, and the ability to use GIS and identify plants should be at the top of your list. If research on birds is your target, then bird census techniques, population dynamics and advanced statistics may be high priority.

  • Is the course mainly practical or theoretical?

    Both, depending on the options that are chosen. Modules range from being largely field or laboratory based through to more traditional style modules with lectures and practicals.

  • How is work examined?

    Mainly through assessment of written, oral and practical work. Some options from elsewhere in the university do have formal examinations.

  • Are there different classes of degrees?

    Degrees can be awarded with merit (for average scores above 60%) and with distinction (for average scores above 70%).

Both Masters in biodiversity and conservation have been designed specifically for postgraduate students and all modules delivered by the Faculty of Biological Sciences are for Masters students only. There are no mixed undergraduate/postgraduate modules except occasionally for optional modules delivered by other departments within the University.


MSc: Compulsory Modules

Biodiversity & Conservation Skills 1

The Skills modules provide practical training and exercises in a diverse range of transferable skills and topics applicable to ecological research. Skills 1 is taken by both MSc and MRes students, and starts with a residential weekend at Malham Tarn Field Studies Centre in the Yorkshire Dales, which provides the opportunity for students to get to know each other, and to be introduced to the ecology of Yorkshire with a range of practical exercises. Back in Leeds, the module covers the use of statistics to analyse ecological data, and oral presentation skills, with associated tutorials.

Semester: 1  Credits: 10  

Biodiversity & Conservation MSc Skills 2

The second MSc Skills module covers a broad range of topics including Fieldwork First Aid (a one day accredited course), Fieldwork Risk Assessment, Public Understanding of Science, ethical issues in ecology, preparing a grant application, participatory ecotourism, biodiversity sampling in Yorskhire, and freshwater invertebrate surveys. These are taught by a combination of internal and external lecturers, using lectures, workshops, practical sessions and field visits.

Semester: 2  Credits: 10  

MSc Summer Research Project

Semester: 2  Credits: 60  

Example MSc module selection

  Module Credits
Compulsory Conservation Masters skills (transferable skills etc) 20
Summer research project 60
Optional Conservation genetics

15

Practical Conservation -structure & organisation 10
Habitat Management 10
African Field Course 30
Plant Identification 15
Conservation Skills 5
Community Ecology 15
Total   180


MRes: Compulsory Modules

Biodiversity & Conservation Skills 1

The Skills modules provide practical training and exercises in a diverse range of transferable skills and topics applicable to ecological research. Skills 1 is taken by both MSc and MRes students, and starts with a residential weekend at Malham Tarn Field Studies Centre in the Yorkshire Dales, which provides the opportunity for students to get to know each other, and to be introduced to the ecology of Yorkshire with a range of practical exercises. Back in Leeds, the module covers the use of statistics to analyse ecological data, and oral presentation skills, with associated tutorials.

Semester: 1  Credits: 10  

Biodiversity & Conservation MRes Skills 2

The second MRes Skills module covers a broad range of topics. There is a one week course in Advanced Statistics, which extends the skills acquired in semester 1 to cover a range of advanced statistical modelling techniques, implemented in the package R. This component is available as a separate module for MSc students. Other topics covered include Fieldwork First Aid (a one day accredited course), Fieldwork Risk Assessment, Public Understanding of Science, ethical issues in ecology, and preparing a research grant application. These are taught by a combination of internal and external lecturers, using lectures, workshops and practical sessions.

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

MRes Research Project

Semester: 1  Credits: 40  

MRes Summer Research Project

On completion of this module, students should have an understanding of the theory describing changes in population size in animals and plants and be trained in techniques for the estimation of population sizes and the description of factors influencing population sizes. They should be able to contribute to the planning and execution of studies on the population status of target species and make informed contributions to management discussions.

Semester: 2  Credits: 60  

Example MRes module selection

  Module Credits
Compulsory Conservation Masters skills (transferable skills etc) 25
Two research projects 100
Optional Community Ecology 15
Conservation Genetics

15

Population Biology 15
Insect Identification 10
Total   180


Optional Modules

Population Dynamics

Provides students with an understanding of the theory describing changes in population size in animals and plants and training in techniques for the estimation of population sizes and the description of factors influencing population sizes. The aim is for students to be trained in how to contribute to the planning and execution of studies on the population status of target species and how to make informed contributions to management discussions. Specific topics include the dynamics of single species populations and of simple interactions, the dynamics of metapopulations, case studies of selected species and population modelling

Semester: 1  Credits: 15  

GIS and the Environment

This module looks at the many ways in which GIS can be applied to the study of the environmental sciences including modelling terrain, hydrology, ecology and land use. The module considers important issues in the application of GIS such as sampling strategies, scale and generalisation, error and uncertainty, and grid-based modelling before moving on to look at how these methods can be applied to gain a better understanding of landscape processes. The module concludes with a look at how GIS is being applied to inform better decisions about the natural environment within the human dimension of the planning process. The module is assessed through the completion of practical assignments and an individual project report

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

Community Ecology

The purpose of most conservation efforts is the preservation of biodiversity. This module focuses on understanding biodiversity: what it is, how it is measured, where it is found, how it may be maintained in natural systems, and how human management may help to preserve it. Specific topics include: Global patterns of biodiversity, latitudinal trends & scaling, the measurement of diversity, sampling effects and spatial scale, community invasibility & succession, reserves as ecological islands, conservation corridors, edge effects and reserve shape, beta-diversity and reserve complimentarity

Semester: 1  Credits: 15  

Conservation Genetics

This module aims to enable to make informed use of genetic data in biodiversity management decisions and contribute to the planning and execution of conservation genetics investigations. It covers a range of issues in conservation genetics including the maintenance and measurement of genetic variation within populations., inbreeding and its consequences, genetic management of populations, genetic markers and hybridisation

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

Advanced Statistics

This module is intended to further develop students statistical skills within the context of current research and practice in biodiversity and conservation, building on those statistical skills acquired during the semester 1 Skills module. The module will consist of practical training and exercises in the use and interpretation of modern statistical methods including General Linear Models, Generalised Linear Models, General Linear Mixed Models and Multivariate Analysis, and their application to biological problems using the statistical package R. This module forms part of the Biodiversity & Conservation Skills 2 module for MRes students.

Semester: 2  Credits: 10  

Habitat Management

An introductory lecture, followed by a series of site visits to meet land managers and Natural England representatives. The module concludes with a series of student seminars where groups present their vision of how one particular reserve should be managed in the future.

Individuals provide executive summaries of their proposals. Groups also organise their own field visits to assess reserve quality from the perspective of dead wood feeding organisms.

Semester: 2  Credits: 10  

Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists

GIS is becoming increasingly important as a tool in landscape ecology and conservation, leading to a need for more training in this area. This module provides an introduction to GIS for ecologists that assumes no prior expertise. It acts as a more thorough stepping stone to the more advanced GIS modules available in The School of Geography. It consists of a series of lectures and practicals intended to provide students with the skills and tools that will enable them to answer simple ecological questions through basic modelling and additionally gain the confidence to tackle more complex problems.

Semester: 1  Credits: 10  

Biodiversity and Conservation Internships

This module allows Masters students to participate in a sandwich year scheme, providing a 12 month period of work experience in the middle of their Masters programme. Internship placements (normally either one 12-month placement or two 6-month placements) are usually found by the student, and agreed if it is relevant to the degree scheme (with e.g. conservation organisations, statutory agencies, consultancies, research centres, or nature reserves).

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

African Ecology Field Course

The African field course is usually based at Mpala, Kenya. It provides a firsthand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community.

Semester: 2  Credits: 30  

Mediterranean Ecology Field Course

The Mediterranean field course takes place over the spring recess at a research station in southern Spain

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

Insect Identification Skills

This module focuses on developing applied taxonomic skills. It comprises an intense week of study and assumes no prior knowledge of insect identification. On the first morning an introductory lecture on survey and identification techniques is followed by practice in telling insects from other terrestrial arthropods and distinguishing the Orders of insects. The rest of the module concentrates on an order of insects that is used regularly in site assessments. The material is identified to Family and then species. Assessment is on the basis of an identification test taken on the last day.

Semester: 1  Credits: 10  

Plant Identification

This module is taught jointly with staff of Natural England Professor John Rodwell. The ability to identify plants has been identified as one of the key skills for conservation biologists. Based around a series of field visits and lectures, this module aims to develop both plant taxonomic skills and NVC (National Vegetation Classification) communities, assuming no prior experience. The use of floras is demonstrated, along with the basics of plant anatomical characters, but this is essentially a hands-on module aiming to introduce students to the plants found in a range of habitats. Assessment is based on a test of identification skills carried out at the end of the module, together with a 'phase one' style exercise that makes use of plant identification skills.

Semester: 2  Credits: 15  

Conservation Skills

This module comprises a series of hands on specialist practical skills options, some taught by staff outside the school and leading to recognised certificates of competency. The options available may vary from year to year and only one option is available to each student. In some cases students are required to provide a financial contribution. Current options include mist netting for birds, small mammal trapping, practical bat conservation, practical fish conservation, chain saw use (certificated), back pack spray use (certificated) and single rope tree-climbing techniques (certificated). Each option is assessed on the basis of a practical skills test at the end of the module

Credits: 5  

Visit the Studying with us pages for an overview of the Faculty of Biological Sciences Graduate School.

Please be aware that course details do change from time to time. ...

... If in doubt, please contact us to verify course content and availability. Whilst the University endeavours to ensure that the information on this website is accurate at the date of publication it does not accept liability for any inaccuracies. The University reserves the right to change or cancel its courses or services at any time without liability even after students have registered at the University. The University's contract with its students does not confer third party benefits for the purposes of Contracts (Right of Third Parties) Act 1999.

Fees and Funding

What does it cost?

The cost of a postgraduate degree varies by course; you will get details of your fees with your offer letter.

UK / EU student fees 2015-16
  MSc/MRes Biodiversity and Conservation £7,500. This includes running costs for the compulsory research project.
  MSc/MRes Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course £9,500. This includes running costs for the compulsory research projects and the African Ecology Field Course (flights, related travel within Kenya, accommodation, meals and insurance).
International student fees 2015-16
  MSc/MRes Biodiversity and Conservation £17,750. This includes running costs for the compulsory research project, but excludes optional field courses.
  MSc/MRes Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course £19,750. This includes running costs for the compulsory research projects and the African Ecology Field Course (flights, related travel within Kenya, accommodation, meals and insurance).
Additional Costs
 

Conservation Skills Options

In some cases there may be an additional charge for conservation skills options run by external providers.

Mediterranean Ecology Field Course Option There will be an additional charge for those selecting to study the Mediterranean field course module.

The academic fee covers tuition and exam costs as well as membership of the students' union. International students will pay a higher fee than UK students as the fees for UK and European Union (EU) students are subsidised by the UK government, but international students can get get financial help from our international scholarships. Also see our Biological Sciences International Scholarships.

Part-Time Option

Biodiversity and Conservation programmes are available part-time, making it a two year course. The cost of the part-time programme per year is half that of the full-time programme per year.

Tuition fee deposit

If you require a visa to study in the UK you will be required to pay a tuition fee deposit before being issued with a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS). The tuition fee deposit will be deducted from your programme tuition fee and shown on your CAS. For more information on our fee deposit please see www.leeds.ac.uk/pgfeesguidance.

Financial help

The majority of our students are self-funded, or funded by their employer or national government. However, several additional sources provide either fully-funded or part-funded scholarships, both for UK and for overseas applicants. Postgraduate scholarships are available to international, UK and EU students and you may be eligible.

If you are experiencing severe hardship you could get help with your living expenses from the access to learning fund, after you have applied for all other available means of support.


When to pay

Fees must be paid in full before you can register as a postgraduate student, unless you will be paying for yourself. If you are self-supporting you can pay fees in two instalments, the first payable at registration.

If you are supported by your government, employer, or other sponsor, you should provide a letter from them addressed to the University, confirming that the fees will be paid directly. Sponsors cannot pay by instalments.

The information provided is for general guidance purposes only. The University believes the information provided is accurate at the time of publication. The University cannot accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Field Courses

We see great value in the learning opportunities offered by practical field courses and offer two optional field courses as part of the course. Both courses run in the Easter vacation and, along with the research project, are often one of the highlights of the programme for many students. As both courses run at Easter students choose just one of the two locations.

Robin caught in mist net Find out more...

Browse our field course photo galleries for more about each field course:

 

Not only are field courses highly enjoyable, but participants benefit from:

  • Applying university-learnt techniques in real life situations
  • Individual and team working
  • Gt Douk Exit High staff /student ratios
  • Tutor support on location
  • First-hand experience of collecting and analysing data
  • Opportunies to develop individual research skills
  • Skills development valued by employers after graduation
  • A chance to get to know staff and fellow students even better

 

Careers

We know that the subject knowledge and training we provide is excellent, but we are also trying to produce well-rounded graduates who have the skills, experience and confidence to succeed in a challenging job market. Transferable skills are a key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A significant proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go onto to study for a PhD. There is intense competition for posts in conservation-related areas in the UK (and probably everywhere). A Masters degree improves your chances, but is no guarantee. Potential employers look for academic qualifications in combination with practical experience — so voluntary work is very important.

The course has strong links with Natural England, which provides staff to teach on certain modules. We also have strong ties with commercial ecological consultancies locally and nationally, providing students for us to train as well as recruiting graduates. All of the following organisations have recruited employees from our biodiversity and conservation Masters:

  • ARKive LogoArkive: a global initiative, gathering together into one centralised digital library, films, photographs and audio recordings of the world’s species.
  • Natural England logoNatural England is a government agency which champions the conservation of wildlife, geology and wild places in England. Its aim " is to create a better natural environment that covers all of our urban, country and coastal landscapes, along with all of the animals, plants and other organisms that live with us."
  • Environmental agency logoThe Environment Agency is the leading public body for protecting and improving the environment in England and Wales.
  • National Trust logoThe National Trust works to preserve and protect the coastline, countryside and buildings of England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
  • Frontier LogoThe Society for Environmental Exploration (SEE) was established in 1989 as a non-profit conservation non-governmental organisation (NGO) dedicated to safeguarding biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Since its inception, SEE has hosted a myriad of global conservation projects under the banner name of Frontier.
  • URS is an international consultancy providing a comprehensive range of integrated planning, management and environmental services in the built and natural environments throughout the world.

 

Graduate Destinations

  • Most of our participants from outside the EU were already in employment before coming to Leeds, and are continuing their careers
  • Amongst European participants, the largest group have entered PhD programmes
  • Natural England has been the largest single employer of our graduates
  • Ecological consultancies are the other major employers of our graduates in the UK
  • Many Yorkshire Wildlife Trust employees are Leeds graduates
  • Overseas, recent graduates are working on cheetah conservation in Botswana and for Frontier expeditions

Other recent graduate employers include:

  • Bradford Metropolitan District Council
  • Chester Zoo
  • Exmoor National Park
  • Forestry Commission
  • IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature)
  • Leeds City Council
  • Marine Conservation Society
  • Newfound Harbor Marine Institute, Florida
  • OPAL (Open Air Laboratories Network)
  • The Environment Agency
  • The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
  • The Society for Environmental Exploration

Read graduate profiles...

A graduation bonus for our students

The Graduate School is an institutional member of the Tropical Biology Association. This means that the TBA reserves at least one place on their excellent field courses (in places such as Madagascar, Tanzania and Uganda) for our Biodiversity & Conservation graduates. The places are not free, but offer great training for anyone interested in tropical ecology.

Careers support and personal development

University of Leeds Careers Centre

The University of Leeds has its own specialist University Careers Centre to help students. In 2007 around 450 employers and over 13,000 students took part in the Career Centre's varied programme of events. The Centre can help students to:

  • plan what to do after university
  • attend careers fairs and employer presentations
  • write a CV
  • improve job applications
  • look for work experience
  • find vacancies

The University’s recent “employer review” score was a magnificent 99 out of 100. (World University League Tables November 2009).

Alumni Mentoring Network

Registered students have access to our Alumni Mentoring network. Networking is one of the most effective ways to find out more about different career opportunities. In an increasingly competitive employment market it is vital to be well-informed and there really is no substitute for talking to people who have first hand experience of the work that interests you. Leeds Alumni Mentoring Network gives students the chance to make contact with Leeds alumni (graduates) to explore career options, gain tips on entry into specific careers and receive supportive advice on developing your career plans.

Leeds for Life

Our Leeds for Life scheme helps all students to recognise and develop the qualities they are gaining from the whole of their University of Leeds experience - both from their course and the huge range of co-curricular opportunities on offer. We want Leeds students to go out into the world and make a difference, in whatever field they choose. We believe that the research-led education at Leeds gives our students the confidence and skills to do just that.

Careers resources

News

Clash of the crayfish: why the Americans are winning

CrayfishAggressive signal crayfish are threatening Yorkshire's native white-clawed crayfish populations due to better parasite resistance and a less fussy diet. The native crayfish suffers from two parasites; plague, which is carried by the American invader, as well as porcelain disease which makes the native crayfish sluggish and suppresses their appetite before eventually killing them a few years later.

Dr Alison Dunn, of the Faculty of Biological Sciences, at the University of Leeds, who led the study, explains: "The signals eat much more compared with the native crayfish. But the situation is exacerbated by a parasite which essentially changes the native's behaviour - the white-clawed crayfish can't eat or handle as much food as the signal, because the parasite weakens its muscles." Read more...

Photo courtesy of the Dunn laboratory

Leeds graduates rediscover rat thought to be extinct

The red-crested tree rat (Santamartamys rufodorsalis) was thought to be extinct, having not been sighted since 1898 despite search attempts, until it appeared at the El Dorado Nature Reserve in Columbia earlier this year. The rodent was spotted by Leeds graduates Lizzie Noble and Simon McKeown, voluntary researchers at the reserve with conservation charity ProAves. Lizzie and Simon completed their Biodiversity and Conservation masters degrees last year and are now working with ProAves at the nature reserve, monitoring endangered amphibians.

This rare breed of tree rat appeared at the reserve near where Lizzie was sitting, and stayed around to be photographed before heading back into the forest. The red-crested tree rat was known only from two specimens dating back from 1898, and can be identified by its black and white tail.

Although the reserve is listed as an Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) site, there are fears that the recently rediscovered mammal could be under threat from feral cats present in much of what remains of the tree rat’s potential range.

This discovery highlights the importance of such conservation areas, and researchers remain hopeful that further discoveries could be made at the El Dorado reserve.

World's oldest fig wasp fossil proves that if it works, don't change it

Bats with backpacks paint pictures with sound

Organic farming shows limited benefit to wildlife

More research news